Class Action Dropbox

As a general rule, class action lawsuits involve a large group of people in some capacity: A collective class, even bound together over the issue of a misrepresented product, suing a defendant, or a band of defendants, multiple negligent companies, for instance, being sued by or persons. While most class action lawsuits are filed for product liability claims, other types of cases also conclude in court, too, including shareholders suing for corporate fraud, workers, and residents over environmental disasters.

Each case, which can be filed in either federal or state court, class action has its benefits. Because fewer witnesses overlap, the trial process understandably moves along more efficiently, while the overall cost of litigation tends to be lower than for one off plaintiffs filing alone.

On the other hand, these types of cases also tend to have drawbacks. Before the class action even progresses, the prosecuting group must be called a class. Federal courts, as well, can conclude class actions if the defendants are state governments or officials or if the plaintiffs number less than {one hundred,100.
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