Class Action Exclude

As a general overview, class action lawsuits involve a band of people in some capacity: A collective class, held together over the issue of a defective product, suing a defendant, or a band of defendants, individual negligent companies, as an example, being sued by a single person. While most class action lawsuits are filed on behalf of product liability claims, other types of cases end up in court, too, including groups of shareholders suing for business fraud, employees for discrimination, and residents over environmental disasters.

With a case, which can be filed in either state or federal court, class action lawsuits has its pluses. Because fewer witnesses overlap, the trial process understandably moves along more efficiently, while the cost of litigation tends to be lower than for one off plaintiffs filing alone.

Additionally, these types of cases do tend to have drawbacks. Before the lawsuit even progresses, the collective group must be named as a class. Federal courts, as well, can stop class actions if the defendants are state governments or officials or if the plaintiffs number less than {one hundred,100.
Class Action Exclude

San Antonio Ordinance Could Affect Conventions
SAN ANTONIO (BP)—A new San Antonio nondiscrimination ordinance likely will prevent the Southern Baptist Convention and the Southern Baptists of Texas Convention from holding annual meetings in the city’s convention facilities, according to an attorney who represents both conventions, referencing the law’s requirement that contracting parties not discriminate on sexual orientation or gender

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Early Returns On Rookie Contributions
Tony Villiotti of draftmetrics.com takes a look at what this year's rookie class has done so far

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Athletics Group Focuses On Admissions In First Meeting
Bubba Cunningham (center) and Admissions Dean Steve Farmer (left) discuss athletics at the Faculty Council meeting Friday.